Thursday, 28 February 2013

Havamal Snippets 32: Conflict is an inevitable fact of life

It's Wednesday (Woden/Odin's Day) which means that it's time for another verse from the Havamal 'Sayings of the High One - Odin'. The poem full of wisdom, both everyday and ethereal. (The poem can be found in full HERE):
32. Many men
are mutually well-disposed,
yet at table will torment each other.
That strife will ever be;
guest will guest irritate. 
(Source: http://heathengods.com/havamal/thorpe.htm)
Conflict is an inevitable fact of life. If you want to open the door then the door will resist your efforts to open it. Yet you must persist until you succeed. One side is victor the other is loser.


[End.]

Wednesday, 27 February 2013

Male Gang Initiation & Tribal Gang Inititation

Both gang and tribal initiations often involve the initiate perpetrating acts of violence against other men from a neighbouring (or enemy) tribe or gang.  In the case of gangs its called jumping, and in the case of tribes it can be called many things, including Ban.


I don't know what judgement to pass on this, or any comments to make on whether it's misandric or not, so just take it as an observation.



[End.]

Tuesday, 26 February 2013

The Convivial Side of Communication

One of the best things about the androsphere and the internet in general is that it has allowed men to communicate to each other with greater ease than they formerly had the ability to do.  The spread of ideas and truths is fundamental if any individual or group is to develop and grow, communication is vital for this.  This applies to men, and to the androsphere as well.

We all know instinctively that women verbally communicate more than men.  It's something you know intuitively from your day-to-day experience of life.  There are also modern scientific studies that have determined that women are more verbose than men, about 40% more verbose according to one study (link).  Now, obviously if you allow one particular source to dominate a given field then you will end up with a monopoly, much like any other thing (material or immaterial), be it rail travel, news media or your domestic water supply.  Females presently monopolise the realm of verbal communication, and this is not a good thing for men.

Monopolies are on the whole contrary to man's nature as an individual and self-determining being.  This because men tend toward individualism (resulting in lots of small businesses and self-employed people in an economy) which allows them to be self-determined and self-sufficient, while women tend toward a herd mentality (which means large businesses and salaried workers) which allows them to be cared for and secure.  This male-female tendency is evident in the number of new small businesses that start up each year: they are dominated by men; and the number of women employed in salaried government jobs (e.g. Hull Employment Services).

When a monopoly dominates a given field it can have a negative effect on the rest of the economy:
1. A lack of competition amongst companies breeds complacency which results in low quality goods being produced (link);
2. The monopoly is hostile to other medium-large companies who threaten it's market dominance (think of the Microsoft-Apple hostility);
3. The monopoly is hostile to smaller companies and denies them the opportunity to grow into a potential threat (aggressive takeovers 'Rail Road Barons');
4. The dominance of the monopoly discourages new businesses and thus new products from entering the market (e.g. Communist North Korea (population ~25 mil) registered only 1 patent in 2010, democratic Luxembourg (population ~40 thou) registered 44 patents in 2010; link).

Each of these negative effects of a monopoly on an economy has parallels in the world of gender based communication:
1. A lack of competition amongst communicators breeds complacency which results in low quality words being produced. 
Modern words are likely to be amalgamations of existing words (e.g. staycation) or imports of foreign words (e.g. tsunami, to replace tidal wave).  There is little creation of new words, which is an indicator that there is little identification of, or creation of, new things (be they material or immaterial).
2. The monopoly is hostile to other medium-large companies who threaten it's dominance.
A woman who is in a dominant role is likely to be hostile to other women who threaten her position as 'Queen Bee'.
3. The monopoly is hostile to smaller companies and denies them the opportunity to grow into a potential threat.
Think of the stereotype of the 'domineering mother' or wife; they both try to deny either the husband or the son their own space and ability to grow/progress.
4. The dominance of the monopoly discourages new businesses and thus new products from entering the market
Men are on the whole more innovative and creative than women.  More patents are registered by men, and men are more explorative and inquisitive than men.  Women usually grumble about new technologies by belittling them as 'boys toys'.  Women also prefer nostalgia or retrograde past-times and pursuits rather than the latest technology.  Just look at the geek image: a man.  Or the industrial revolutionist: a man.  If you allow a woman to dominate a single conversation or communication as a whole, then new words, phrases etc will be less likely to be introduced.


If men want to continue communicating with one another as they have formerly done (e.g. in social clubs and playing sport) are presently doing (e.g. on the internet and playing sport/martial arts), then they need to prevent women forming a monopoly on communication (either on a personal level in your house or social group or a societal level).  Women are well known to bear hostility towards gangs of men and try to deconstruct them: sports teams now must permit women, Men's Clubs must permit women (but women are allowed their own clubs), constant prattling on about 'the patriarchal conspiracy', even the Boy Scouts must open up (but no the Girl Guides).  All of these infractions against men deny men the ability to communicate to each other openly, freely.

If men let women dominate communications then it will be to men's detriment, and eventually women's: men will become isolated (have their lines of communication with their friends cut) and then be dominated by their women folk (all the mans potential friends will be 'screened' by the woman so she can root-out the undesirables). 

Thus, whenever you can communicate to men, men at work, men at home, men in the family, male friends, men in your neighbourhood.  A simple gesture, a nod, a few words, a conversation, whatever is best for the time; all of it will be pleasant, and all of it will help to foster an environment of free and friendly intra-gender communication for the present and for the future.



Post-Script:
Here's an interesting link a part of the narcissistic side in women, and how their narcissism may explain why they dominate conversations:

'Women[..]actually get a buzz out of hearing their own voices'.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-419040/Women-talk-times-men-says-study.html



[End.]

Sunday, 24 February 2013

Havamal Snippets 31: Mockery and ridicule are used by enemies

It's Wednesday (Woden/Odin's Day) which means that it's time for another verse from the Havamal 'Sayings of the High One - Odin'. The poem full of wisdom, both everyday and ethereal. (The poem can be found in full HERE):
31. Clever thinks himself
the guest who jeers a guest,
if he takes to flight.
Knows it not certainly
he who prates at meat,
whether he babbles among foes.

(Source: http://heathengods.com/havamal/thorpe.htm)
Mocking and open ridicule, either by one social group to another or by one person to another, are indicators of who one's enemy is.


[End.]

Friday, 22 February 2013

Men Of Yore: Robert Owen

This is another in a series of posts about men from history who have either achieved great things in one form or another by pushing boundaries: either in themselves or in society or science or exploration of some form.  Boundary pushing and growth is what men do, it's their nature: to grow and push outwards.  We, as men, are the frontiersmen/the vanguard, the first to discover/uncover new territory, in a metaphysical sense (i.e. including both material and the immaterial) that is later colonised and 'civilised' by the rest of humanity. 

It is also partly intended to show images, be they paintings, statues or photographs of the countenaces of men of yore.  Because, quite frankly, many men wear the countenances of women these days: smiling, smirking, cooing, rolling their eyes, looking smug etc.  It's a sign of the times, and by showing some images of men from the past, I hope to show some modern men why looking surly, frowning and giving hard-ball stares at people is something to do, something to practice.



Robert Owen, 1821 (aged 50)

Robert Owen (14 May 1771 – 17 November 1858) was a Welsh social reformer and one of the founders of utopian socialism and the cooperative movement.
Owen's philosophy was based on three intellectual pillars: First, no one was responsible for his will and his own actions because his whole character is formed independently of himself; people are products of their heredity and environment, hence his support for education and labour reform. Second, all religions are based on the same ridiculous imagination, that make man a weak, imbecile animal; a furious bigot and fanatic; or a miserable hypocrite; (though in his later years he embraced Spiritualism).[1] Third, support for the putting-out system instead of the factory system.
[..]
Robert Owen was born in Newtown, a small market town in Montgomeryshire, Mid Wales, in 1771. He was the sixth of seven children. His father, also named Robert Owen, had a small business as a saddler and ironmonger. Owen's mother was a Miss Williams, and came from one of the prosperous farming families.[2] Here young Owen received almost all his school education, which ended at the age of ten.
[..]
Many employers operated the truck system, whereby payment to the workers was made in part or totally by tokens. These tokens had no value outside the mill owner's "truck shop". The owners were able to supply shoddy goods to the truck shop and charge top prices. A series of "Truck Acts" (1831–1887) stopped this abuse. The Acts made it an offence not to pay employees in common currency. Owen opened a store where the people could buy goods of sound quality at little more than wholesale cost, and he placed the sale of alcohol under strict supervision. He sold quality goods and passed on the savings from the bulk purchase of goods to the workers. These principles became the basis for the cooperative shops in Britain that continue to trade today.
His greatest success was in the support of the young, to which he devoted special attention. He was the founder of infant childcare in Great Britain, especially in Scotland.
[..]
He was at first regarded with suspicion as a stranger but he soon won the confidence of his people. The mills continued to have great commercial success, but some of Owen's schemes involved considerable expense, which displeased his partners. Tired of the restrictions imposed on him by men who wished to conduct the business on the ordinary principles, in 1813 Owen arranged to have them bought out by new found investors.
[..]
At an early age he had lost all belief in the prevailing forms of religion and had thought out a creed for himself, which he considered an entirely new and original discovery. The chief points in this philosophy were that man's character is made not by him but for him, that it has been formed by circumstances over which he had no control, that he is not a proper subject either of praise or blame.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Owen




Robert Owen could thus be compared to Henry Ford in regards to how he treated his workers: as people to value, not workers to exploit.  Though both tended towards the more domineering, paternalistic approach (which has it's downside if lived out to the extreme: communistic and dictatorial rule of the population) they had respect for their fellow man.




Check out some of the other entries from the 'Men of Yore' series:
Wyatt Earp
William 'Wild Bill' Cody
Andrew Carnegie
Duke of Viseu (Henry the Navigator)
Meriwether Lewis
Arthur Schopenhauer
Theodore Roosevelt
Rudolph Diesel
John Snow
Ludwig van Beethoven
Henry Ford
George Custer


[End.]

Thursday, 21 February 2013

Havamal Snippets 30: "It is better to keep your mouth quiet.."

It's Wednesday (Woden/Odin's Day) which means that it's time for another verse from the Havamal 'Sayings of the High One - Odin'. The poem full of wisdom, both everyday and ethereal. (The poem can be found in full HERE):
30. For a gazing-stock
no man shall have another,
although he come a stranger to his house.
Many a one thinks himself wise,
if he is not questioned,
and can sit in a dry habit. 
(Source: http://heathengods.com/havamal/thorpe.htm)
People who stay in their comfort zone all of their lives and leave their beliefs unchallenged quite often think that they are wise (in the right) and that everyone else a fool (is in the wrong).


[End.]

Tuesday, 19 February 2013

Conspiracy Theories

I've been intending to post something on Conspiracy Theories and why people need to be wary of taking everything that is posted on the net at face value on 'The Elite' (i.e. the people who determine the laws that you and me live by) because it often dis-empowers you rather than empowering you, but as The Black Pill already has a good post on the subject I'll just post a link to his article instead:

http://omegavirginrevolt.wordpress.com/conspiracy-theory-leads-to-inaction-and-apathy




P.S. of course the caveat should be added that not all Conspiracies are borderline insane, rant-like, conjecture (just think of the price rigging that British Airways engaged in, that's a bunch of people Conspiring together for a common purpose); or that all Conspiracy Theories are insane and should be dismissed out of hand.


[End.]

Sunday, 17 February 2013

Havamal Snipepts 29: Be Warey of the Silver Tongued

It's Wednesday (Woden/Odin's Day) which means that it's time for another verse from the Havamal 'Sayings of the High One - Odin'. The poem full of wisdom, both everyday and ethereal. (The poem can be found in full HERE):
29. He utters too many
futile words
who is never silent;
a garrulous tongue,
if it be not checked,
sings often to its own harm.
(Source: http://heathengods.com/havamal/thorpe.htm)
Be warey of those who speak at too quickly, or use words that are too ostentatious or uncommon (such as jargon, or buzz words like Tsunami instead of tidal wave), for they are not as wise as they appear. Women speak more words than men per day and often do so just to inflict psychical/mental discomfort in the other person.


[End.]

Friday, 15 February 2013

Men of Yore: Richard Trevithick

This is another in a series of posts about men from history who have either achieved great things in one form or another by pushing boundaries: either in themselves or in society or science or exploration of some form.  Boundary pushing and growth is what men do, it's their nature: to grow and push outwards.  We, as men, are the frontiersmen/the vanguard, the first to discover/uncover new territory, in a metaphysical sense (i.e. including both material and the immaterial) that is later colonised and 'civilised' by the rest of humanity. 

It is also partly intended to show images, be they paintings, statues or photographs of the countenaces of men of yore.  Because, quite frankly, many men wear the countenances of women these days: smiling, smirking, cooing, rolling their eyes, looking smug etc.  It's a sign of the times, and by showing some images of men from the past, I hope to show some modern men why looking surly, frowning and giving hard-ball stares at people is something to do, something to practice.




Richard Trevithick, 1816 (aged 45)


Richard Trevithick (13 April 1771 – 22 April 1833) was a British inventor and mining engineer from Cornwall.[1] Born in the mining heartland of Cornwall, Trevithick was immersed in mining and engineering from a young age. The son of a mining captain, he performed poorly in school, but went on to be an early pioneer in steam-powered rail. His most significant contribution was to the development of the first high pressure steam engine, he also built the first full-scale working railway steam locomotive. On 21 February 1804 the world's first locomotive-hauled railway journey took place as Trevithick's unnamed steam locomotive hauled a train along the tramway of the Penydarren Ironworks, in Merthyr Tydfil in Wales.[2][3]
[..]
Richard Trevithick was born at Tregajorran (in the parish of Illogan), between Camborne and Redruth, in the heart of one of the rich mineral mining areas of Cornwall. He was the youngest-but-one child and the only boy in a family of six children. He was very tall for the era at 6 ft 2in, as well as athletic and concentrated more on sport than schoolwork. Sent to the village school at Camborne, he did not take much advantage of the education provided – one of his school masters described him as "a disobedient, slow, obstinate, spoiled boy, frequently absent and very inattentive". An exception was arithmetic, for which he had an aptitude, but arrived at the correct answers by unconventional means.[4]
[..]
Trevithick became engineer at the Ding Dong Mine in 1797, and there (in conjunction with Edward Bull) he pioneered the use of high-pressure steam. He worked on building and modifying steam engines to avoid the royalties due to Watt on the separate condenser patent.
[..]
According to his son Francis, Trevithick was the first to make high pressure steam work in England in 1799. Not only would a high pressure steam engine eliminate the condenser, but it would allow the use of a smaller cylinder, saving space and weight. He reasoned that his engine could now be more compact, lighter and small enough to carry its own weight even with a carriage attached.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Trevithick



If he had been born today in the US or UK, he may have been considered to have ADHD because of his inability to sit still and be attentive during academic classes, and thus would have been administered Ritalin.  If he had been doped up with Ritalin then he probably wouldn't have come up with the innovations that he did.  Each man excells in his own way, there isn't a 'one size fits all' method that you can use on humans, particularly men.  Cage us, tame us, level us, and domesticate us and civilization, nay, society would not last a generation.  Men learn and innovate and solve problems by their own means, their own methods, their own way.  If you impose Your will upon them, then you kill Their will; or to paraphrase Chechar 'you steal their souls'.  To allow boys and men to learn, then you must act as a servant to them: understand their needs and meet them.  Farmers have done this for millenia, good parents have done this for millenia, you help a thing to grow by meeting It's needs, It's want's.




Check out some of the other entries from the 'Men of Yore' series:

Wyatt Earp
William 'Wild Bill' Cody
Andrew Carnegie
Duke of Viseu (Henry the Navigator)
Meriwether Lewis
Arthur Schopenhauer
Theodore Roosevelt
Rudolph Diesel
John Snow
Ludwig van Beethoven
Henry Ford
George Custer


[End.]

Thursday, 14 February 2013

Havamal Snippets 28: Wisdom Lies in Both Knowing and Asking

It's Wednesday (Woden/Odin's Day) which means that it's time for another verse from the Havamal 'Sayings of the High One - Odin'. The poem full of wisdom, both everyday and ethereal. (The poem can be found in full HERE):
28. He thinks himself wise,
who can ask questions
and converse also;
conceal his ignorance
no one can,
because it circulates among men. 
(Source: http://heathengods.com/havamal/thorpe.htm)
Wisdom is both knowing and asking; it's active aswell as passive. This means that the unwise will be double aided (if his nature is good) or doubly crippled (if his nature is bad) in the face of a wise man.


[End.]

Tuesday, 12 February 2013

Winning a Debate:

To win, you make the rules. 

Manzikert, Agincourt, Ireland; the Byzantines, French Norman Knights, and English Norman Knights expected the enemy to 'fight fairly', to 'fight by their rules', 'be Chivalrous', i.e. fight on terms/rules/laws determined by those who have the biggest advantage in their own system.  Why would anyone fight like that?  Why would you fight like that?  What's the point?  Allowing someone else to set the rules that you play by is nothing but a sure-fire way to lose at any given competition.  If someone else has determined the rules/laws then it means that you are at an immediate disadvatage.

So how do you win?  Make the rules, choose the rules that you will play by, fight by.

Choose rules that you want to fight by.  Choose the battlefield in space and time that you will fight on.  Choose the weapons that you and your opponent will fight with.  Choose what the terms of victory are.  Choose victory.  Be victorious.

Dean Esmay found out that 'playing fair' 'being just' or 'playing by someone elses rules' doesn't work.  He's right, most people aren't reasonable, they don't listen to reason, they listen to to physical force (e.g. a loud voice or imposing body lanugage) or appeals to some status symbol.  As Dean says: 'being nice doesn't work'.

 

[End.]

Sunday, 10 February 2013

Havamal Snippets 27: If unwise, be quiet, don't babble

It's Wednesday (Woden/Odin's Day) which means that it's time for another verse from the Havamal 'Sayings of the High One - Odin'. The poem full of wisdom, both everyday and ethereal. (The poem can be found in full HERE):
27. A foolish man,
who among people comes,
had best be silent;
for no one knows
that he knows nothing,
unless he talks to much.
He who previously knew nothing
will still know nothing
talk he ever so much. 
(Source: http://heathengods.com/havamal/thorpe.htm)
As Abraham Lincoln or Mark Twain said: "It's best to keep your mouth closed and let them think you a fool than open it and remove all doubt."


[End.]

Friday, 8 February 2013

Men of Yore: Wyatt Earp

This is another in a series of posts about men from history who have either achieved great things in one form or another by pushing boundaries: either in themselves or in society or science or exploration of some form.  Boundary pushing and growth is what men do, it's their nature: to grow and push outwards.  We, as men, are the frontiersmen/the vanguard, the first to discover/uncover new territory, in a metaphysical sense (i.e. including both material and the immaterial) that is later colonised and 'civilised' by the rest of humanity. 

It is also partly intended to show images, be they paintings, statues or photographs of the countenaces of men of yore.  Because, quite frankly, many men wear the countenances of women these days: smiling, smirking, cooing, rolling their eyes, looking smug etc.  It's a sign of the times, and by showing some images of men from the past, I hope to show some modern men why looking surly, frowning and giving hard-ball stares at people is something to do, something to practice.



Wyatt Earp, 1881 (aged 33)

Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp (March 19, 1848 – January 13, 1929) was a city policeman ("assistant city marshal") in Wichita, Kansas and Dodge City, Kansas. He also served as a deputy sheriff and deputy U.S. marshal in Tombstone, Arizona. He was also at different times a farmer, teamster, buffalo hunter, bouncer, saloon-keeper, gambler, miner, and on one occasion a boxing referee. He was never a cowboy or drover. He is best known for his part in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral during which three outlaw Cowboys were killed. The 30-second gunfight defined the rest of his life. Earp's modern-day reputation is that of the Old West's "toughest and deadliest gunman of his day."[1]
[..]
Among his peers, Wyatt was respected. His deputy Jimmy Cairns described Wyatt's work as a police officer in Wichita, Kansas. "Wyatt Earp was a wonderful officer. He was game to the last ditch and apparently afraid of nothing. The cowmen all respected him and seemed to recognize his superiority and authority at such times as he had to use it." [102] He described Wyatt as "the most dependable man I ever knew; a quiet, unassuming chap who never drank and in all respects a clean young fellow."[103]
[..]
Bill Dixon knew Wyatt early in his adult life. He wrote:
Wyatt was a shy young man with few intimates. With casual acquaintances he seldom spoke unless spoken to. When he did say anything it was to the point, without fear or favor, which wasn't relished by some; but that never bothered Wyatt. To those who knew him well he was a genial companion. He had the most even disposition I ever saw; I never knew him to lose his temper. He was more intelligent, better educated, and far better mannered than the majority of his associates, which probably did not help them to understand him. His reserve limited his friendships, but more than one stranger, down on his luck, has had firsthand evidence of Wyatt's generosity. I think his outstanding quality was the nicety with which he gauged the time and effort for every move. That, plus his absolute confidence in himself, gave him the edge over the run of men.[6]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyatt_Earp




Check out some of the other entries from the 'Men of Yore' series:

William 'Wild Bill' Cody
Andrew Carnegie
Duke of Viseu (Henry the Navigator)
Meriwether Lewis
Arthur Schopenhauer
Theodore Roosevelt
Rudolph Diesel
John Snow
Ludwig van Beethoven
Henry Ford
George Custer



[End.]

Thursday, 7 February 2013

Havamal Snipets 26: Expose your opinions and test them

It's Wednesday (Woden/Odin's Day) which means that it's time for another verse from the Havamal 'Sayings of the High One - Odin'. The poem full of wisdom, both everyday and ethereal. (The poem can be found in full HERE):
26. A foolish man
thinks he know everything
if placed in unexpected difficulty;
but he knows not
what to answer,
if to the test he is put. 
(Source: http://heathengods.com/havamal/thorpe.htm)
A thought for those who socialise only with people that confirm their beliefs and never let them get tested.


[End.]

Tuesday, 5 February 2013

Marriage and Raising Children in the Modern World:

To increase the odds of a thing succeeding means that you need to understand the requirements of the thing and the threats to the thing.  In the case of marriage and fatherhood, this means that you need to understand what could cause a marriage to fail, or how you could 'lose' your children.  In the context of marriage and fatherhood, this means that you need to understand (as best as you can) what a marriage needs to succeed, and what children need to succeed.  It also means that you need to be aware of the threats that oppose your marriage and your children.

Understanding the requirements of a thing requires the person to observe the thing (which means being passive/calm, and discerning) then ask questions to yourself on how best to meet the needs of the thing.  Answers to the questions will come from the person (you), which may or may not be experienced as a 'Eureka' moment (i.e. a moment of comprehension).

Understanding the threats to the success of a thing requires the person to observe the environment in which the thing exists.  In the context of marriage and fatherhood this means being aware of the surrounding immaterial and material environment (e.g. cultural attitudes toward men, civil laws; road traffic, biological viruses).

The types of threats to marriage and children change over time, space and other elements.  For instance the threats to fatherhood experienced by pre-industrial cultures (e.g. modern day Amerindian tribes, or circa 500 BC Scythian tribesmen), are different to those experienced by first world industrial cultures (e.g. Texarkana, Toronto, Tewkesbury, Toulouse, Turku.)

In medieval times the threats to marriage were likely to be during childbirth. 
In modern times the threats to marriage are likely to be from divorces.

In medieval times the threats to being a father were likely to be from infant dying during childbirth.
In modern times the threats to being a father are likely to be from family courts.

As a modern man that means that your present threat to losing your children is via divorce and the family courts.  This means that to improve the chances of your 'thing' being successful (be it marriage or fatherhood) then you need to understand the threats that oppose it, just as the medieval man had to understand about hygiene in order to improve the chances of his son or daughter growing to adulthood.  As was germs a threat in medieval times, so to now are Civil Laws a threat in modern times; as was hygiene a remedy in medieval times, so to now amending certain Civil Laws a remedy in modern times.

Understand the requirements of a thing so that you can make it successful understand the threats to the thing so that you can avoid defeat.


[End.]


[Inspiration for writing this post was received after reading the title and first two lines of the blog post 'Marriage vs LTR' (http://heartiste.wordpress.com/2012/11/14/marriage-vs-ltrs/) over at Chateau Heartiste.  The rest of the CH blog entry may be good, I don't know having not read it yet.]

Sunday, 3 February 2013

Havamal Snippets 25: Beware of Fake Smiles

It's Wednesday (Woden/Odin's Day) which means that it's time for another verse from the Havamal 'Sayings of the High One - Odin'. The poem full of wisdom, both everyday and ethereal. (The poem can be found in full HERE):
25. A foolish man
thinks all who speak him fair
to be his friends;
but he will find,
if into court he comes,
that he has few advocates. 
(Source: http://heathengods.com/havamal/thorpe.htm)
Be ware of the fake smiles, be they of salesmen or women.


[End.]

Friday, 1 February 2013

Men of Yore: William 'Wild Bill' Cody

This is another in a series of posts about men from history who have either achieved great things in one form or another by pushing boundaries: either in themselves or in society or science or exploration of some form.  Boundary pushing and growth is what men do, it's their nature: to grow and push outwards.  We, as men, are the frontiersmen/the vanguard, the first to discover/uncover new territory, in a metaphysical sense (i.e. including both material and the immaterial) that is later colonised and 'civilised' by the rest of humanity. 

It is also partly intended to show images, be they paintings, statues or photographs of the countenaces of men of yore.  Because, quite frankly, many men wear the countenances of women these days: smiling, smirking, cooing, rolling their eyes, looking smug etc.  It's a sign of the times, and by showing some images of men from the past, I hope to show some modern men why looking surly, frowning and giving hard-ball stares at people is something to do, something to practice.



William Cody, 1865 (aged 19)

William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody (February 26, 1846 – January 10, 1917) was an American soldier, bison hunter and showman. He was born in the Iowa Territory (now the U.S. state of Iowa), in Le Claire but lived several years in Canada before his family moved to the Kansas Territory. Buffalo Bill received the Medal of Honor in 1872 for service to the US Army as a scout. One of the most colorful figures of the American Old West, Buffalo Bill became famous for the shows he organized with cowboy themes, which he toured in Great Britain and Europe as well as the United States.
[..]
William Frederick Cody was born on February 26, 1846 on a farm just outside of Le Claire, Iowa.[4]
[..]
In Kansas, the family was frequently persecuted by pro-slavery supporters, forcing Isaac Cody to spend much of his time away from home. His enemies learned of a planned visit to his family and plotted to kill him on the way. The young Cody, despite his youth and the fact that he was ill, rode 30 miles (48 km) to warn his father. Cody's father went to Cleveland, Ohio to organize a colony of thirty families to bring back to Kansas. During his return trip he caught a cold, which he eventually died from. The combination of his stab wound, that he never fully recovered from, and complications from kidney disease became too much and he died in April, 1857.[6][7]

After the father's death, the Cody family suffered financially. At age 11, Bill Cody took a job with a freight carrier as a "boy extra." He would ride up and down the length of a wagon train, and deliver messages to the drivers and workmen.
[..]
As a frontier scout, he respected Native Americans and supported their rights. He employed many more natives than Sitting Bull, as he thought his show offered them good pay for a better life. He called them "the former foe, present friend, the American", and once said, "Every Indian outbreak that I have ever known has resulted from broken promises and broken treaties by the government."[3]
[..]
He supported conservation by speaking out against hide-hunting and pushing for a hunting season.[3]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Cody




Check out some of the other entries from the 'Men of Yore' series:

Andrew Carnegie
Duke of Viseu (Henry the Navigator)
Meriwether Lewis
Arthur Schopenhauer
Theodore Roosevelt
Rudolph Diesel
John Snow
Ludwig van Beethoven
Henry Ford
George Custer


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